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Buddy Burner Stove/Heater

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Montauk

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Did some looking and I didn't see this suggested, and kinda can't believe it hasn't been yet. I was inspired to post this because of this suggestion: rocket stove.

A buddy burner, aka hobo stove, is a very easy to make portable stove which can also be used as a heater.

The basic burner:



Materials Needed:
  1. Metal Can: Tuna fish & catfood cans work great. Soup cans can also be used, just cut the excess material away from the top end to the approximate height of a tuna can. Other types of metal tins can be used, such as an empty Altoids mint tin, be creative!
  2. Cardboard: Just about any scrap cardboard will do, though I suggest using cardboard with large flutes (for instance, e-flute cardboard would not work as well as c-flute). C-flute is the most common and is what you typically find, and it works very well!
  3. Candle Wax: If you're using this as a stove for cooking use unscented wax, but in a bind any candle wax will do. For a heater, scented wax is nice.
Steps to make:
  1. Wash out the metal can.
  2. Cut the cardboard into strips approximately the same width as the height of the can, cutting perpendicular across the flutes/corrugation.
  3. Tightly roll up the cardboard into a spiral and put it in the can. If one rolled up strip is not enough you can easily add more until the can is full.
  4. Create a wick with a small piece of cardboard and stuff it into the center.
  5. Melt the wax in a small cooking pot, metal bowl, or even another can. It is advised to use the "double boiling" method to melt the wax. In other words, use a larger pot with water and float your smaller pot on top (this prevents accidental ignition of the wax). Plus you get clean water out of the deal!
  6. After the wax is melted pour it into the can stuffed with cardboard until the wax is even with the top of the can. Let the wax fully dry.
  7. Once dried you'll notice the wax has shrunk down. Repeat steps 5-6 as needed until the wax is even with the top of the can once dried.
It is easy to refill the buddy burner with fuel (wax) as needed after use as well as replace the cardboard material when necessary.


Cooking stove:



Materials Needed:

  1. Buddy burner: See above. ;)
  2. Large can: Any large bulk can will do from olives, tomato sauce, peaches, etc.


Steps to make:
  1. Cut a square/rectangle hole in the side of the open end of the large can (bottom of stove). This allows you to slide the buddy burner in & out without having to pick the large can up. It also serves as an airflow intake once lit.
  2. Make a few holes in the side of the large can near the closed end (top of stove) on the opposite side of the square/rectangle opening. This serves a an airflow exhaust.
  3. Throw an egg on top, light the burner and get cooking!


Heater: (note, tealight heater shown)


Essentially this is a variation of the tealight heater, same concept.


Materials Needed:
  1. Buddy burner: See above. ;)
  2. Large clay pot: Any large clay pot commonly used for indoor/outdoor plants.
  3. Medium clay pot: Again commonly used for indoor/outdoor plants. This pot must be able to fit inside the larger one.
  4. Metal Plug: You'll need some sort of metal plug to cover the small drain hole in the medium pot. Just about any sort of scrap metal will do (sheet metal, aluminum foil, etc.) You can also use a bolt, a nut, and some washers to seal the hole.
  5. Supports: You'll need something to set the pots on, it's important that it's heat resistant (won't melt or catch fire). Bricks, stacks of tile, masonry stone, cake tin, etc.


Steps to make:
  1. Place your buddy burner down with the supports on the sides (supports may need adjustment later).
  2. Plug the drain hole of the medium pot and place it upside down over the buddy burner.
  3. Place the large pot upside down over the medium pot.
  4. Light the buddy burner and enjoy! It does take a little while for the pots to completely heat up completely, but they do a great job of radiating heat once ready.

There are LOTS of alternative methods & items that can be used to make these, I just wanted to provide the basics as examples.
 

Num47

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Very rudimentary, I like it indeed...
+1
 
Thread starter #3

Montauk

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Indeed, that's one of the reasons I like them so much. I've made up a few of these that are thrown in with some other "bug-out" stash items in a duffel bag.

I've seen the tealight heaters (with 4 tealights as shown in the photo above) producing heat around 270*F once fully heated up (temp. taken from the inside between the two pots with a temp. probe) and is said to do very well with heating up small rooms or supplementing other heating methods. The buddy burner would probably produce even more heat. Not sure if a buddy burner would burn as long as a tealight or not, I suspect it largely depends on what type of wax is used.
 
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